UK, Parliament, Correspondence respecting the Proposed Union of the British North American Provinces (1867)


Document Information

Date: 1867-02-08
By: UK (Parliament)
Citation: UK, Parliament, Correspondence respecting the Proposed Union of the British North American Provinces (London: George Edward Eyre and William Spottiswoode, 1867).
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BRITISH NORTH AMERICAN PROVINCES.

CORRESPONDENCE

RESPECTING

THE PROPOSED UNION

OF THE

BRITISH NORTH AMERICAN PROVINCES

(In continuation of Papers presented 7th February 1865.)

 

Presented to both houses of Parliament by Command of her Majesty,
8th February 1867.

LONDON:
PRINTED BY GEORGE EDWARD EYRE AND WILLIAM SPOTTISWOODE,
PRINTERS TO THE QUEEN’S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY.
FOR HER MAJESTY’S STATIONERY OFFICE.

1867.

[PRICE 1s 10d,]

[Page ii]

LIST OF PAPERS.

CANADA.

DESPATCHES FROM THE GOVERNOR.

No. in series —- Date. Page. No. in series —- Date. Page.
1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

203

12

25

26

28

32

35

36

68

73

74

164

183

3

18

December 23, 1861 –

January 11, 1865 –

January 19, 1865 –

January 20, 1865 –

January 25, 1865 –

January 26, 1865 –

January 30, 1865 –

January 30, 1865 –

March 10, 1865 –

Match 15, 1865 –

March 15, 1865 –

August 14, 1865 –

September 20, 1865-

September 30, 1865-

June 8, 1865 –         –

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

8

9

10

11

14

16

17

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

113

115

116

147

150

152

Separate

184

Separate

203

6

5

5

6

August 15, 1866 –

August 16, 1866 –

August 16, 1866 –

September 25, 1866 –

September 28, 1866 –

October 1, 1866 –

November 3, 1866 –

November 3, 1866 –

November 5, 1866 –

November 29, 1866 –

December 12, 1866 –

December 13, 1866 –

January 4, 1867 –

January 4, 1867 –

 

18

18

22

[…]

26

26

27

27

28

28

29

31

36

37

 

DESPATCHES FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

5

21

30

32

18

58

95

120

127

137

117

150

9

70

20

January 13, 1865 –

February 15, 1865 –

February 24, 1865 –

February 25, 1865 –

March 29, 1865 –

April 8, 1865 –       –

June 17, 1865 –    –

June 22, 1865 –     –

August 5, 1865 –

September 6, 1865 –

October 7, 1865 –

October 18, 1865 –

January 27, 1866 –

June 30, 1866 –

August […], 1866 –

42

42

42

42

43

43

43

45

45

46

46

46

46

47

47

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

39

41

12

47

50

63

80

100

104

119

123

121

131

132

August 31, 1866 –

August 31, 1866 –

August 31, 1866 –

September 5, 1866 –

September 13, 1866 –

September 26, 1866 –

October 18, 1866 –

November 22, 1866 –

November 23, 1866 –

December 17, 1866 –

January 5, 1867 –

January 7, 1867 –

January 30, 1867 –

January 30, 1867 –

47

48

48

48

49

49

50

50

50

50

51

51

51

51

 

NOVA SCOTIA.

DESPATCHES FROM THE GOVERNOR.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

[…]

[…]

49

[…]

55

56

75

78

87

98

30

32

35

December 8, 1861 –

December 23, 1861 –

January 5, 1865 –

January 13, 1865 –

February 2, 1865 –

February 15, 1865 –

April 27, 1865 –

May 9, 1865 –      –

July […], 1865 –     –

July 6, 1865 –        –

April 26, 1866 –      –

April 26, 1866 –       –

May 10, 1866 –      –

52

53

54

54

55

56

58

59

60

61

61

62

65

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

12

43

44

48

49

50

51

56

61

Separate

63

68

71

May 24, 1866 –     –

June 6, 1866 –      –

June 6, 1866 –      –

June 19, 1866 –    –

June 19, 1866 –     –

June 19, 1866 –     –

June 19, 1866 –     –

July 2, 1866 –    –

July 16, 1866 –     –

July 19, 1866 –     –

July 25, 1866 –      –

August 16, 1866 –

November 8, 1866 –

67

68

69

70

71

71

72

72

73

74

74

75

77

 

[Page iii]

DESPATCHES FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

No. in series —- Date. Page. No. in series —- Date. Page.
1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

3

5

10

12

29

30

36

26

29

30

January 7, 1865 –

February 3, 1865 –

March 1, 1865 –

March 10, 1865 –

June 24, 1865 –      –

June 24, 1865 –      –

July 22, 1865 –       –

May 12, 1866 –      –

May 25, 1866 –      –

May 25, 1866 –      –

78

78

79

79

79

80

80

80

81

81

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

38

40

41

2

5

9

10

13

17

28

June 9, 1866 –    –

June 21, 1866 –    –

June 21, 1866 –    –

July 6, 1866 –    –

July 21, 1866 –     –

August 3, 1866 –    –

August 4, 1866 –     –

August 24, 1866 –     –

September 11, 1866 –

November 22, 1866 –

81

82

82

82

82

83

83

83

84

84

 

NEW BRUNSWICK.

DESPATCH FROM THE GOVERNOR.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

93

9

12

23

24

25

29

30

39

[…]

45

47

48

54

58

83

84

December 5, 1861 –

January 30, 1865 –

January 30, 1865 –

February 27, 1865 –

March 6, 1865 –   –

March 13, 1865 –   –

March 27, 1865 –   –

March 27, 1865 –   –

April 27, 1865 –    –

May 8, 1865 –    –

May 22, 1865 –    –

June 5, 1865 –    –

June 5, 1865 –    –

July  3, 1865 –    –

July 15, 1865 –    –

November 6, 1865 –

November 20, 1865 –

85

85

88

88

89

90

91

92

92

92

93

94

95

95

99

100

102

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

12

15a

17

18

21

44

44

49

50

53

55

56

59

61

62

63

March 14, 1866 –    –

March 26, 1866 –  –

April 3, 1866 –     –

April 9, 1866 –   –

April 10, 1866 –   –

June 4, 1866 –      –

June 4, 1866 –      –

June 5, 1866 –    –

June 13, 1866 –     –

June 21, 1866 –     –

June 23, 1866 –     –

June 25, 1866 –    –

July 2, 1866 –    –

July 9, 1866 –     –

July 16, 1866 –     –

July 16, 1866 –      –

103

103

101

104

105

106

107

110

110

111

111

112

113

113

114

115

 

DESPATCHES FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

53

54

60

65

66

67

76

78

81

82

83

91

115

February 27, 1865 –

February 27, 1865 –

March 18, 1865 –     –

April 1, 1865 –      –

April 12, 1865 –    –

April 13, 1865 –

May 27, 1865 –    –

May 27, 1865 –    –

June 24, 1865 –    –

June 24, 1865 –    –

June 24, 1865 –    –

August 4, 1865 –   –

December 7, 1865 –

116

116

116

117

117

117

118

118

118

119

119
119

120

11

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

11

16

19

20

38

39

40

[…]

[.]6

[.]7

10

11

12

March 31, 1866 –    –

April 11, 1866 –    –

April 28, 1866 –    –

April 28, 1866 –    –

June 22, 1866 –    –

June 22, 1866 –    –

June 22, 1866 –    –

July 6, 1866 –    –

July 20, 1866 –    –

July 21, 1866 –     –

August 1, 1866 –   –

August 1, 1866 –    –

August 2, 1866 –    –

120

120

120

121

121

121

122

122

122

122

123

123

123

 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND.

DESPATCHES FROM THE GOVERNOR.

1

2

3

4

85

1

27

14

December 30, 1861 –

January 9, 1865 –

April 3, 1865 –     –

May 23, 1865 –      –

121

125

125

129

5

6

7

42

44

88

May 9, 1866 –    –

May 11, 1866 –    –

November 7, 1866 –    –

130

131

134

 

 

[Page iv]

DESPATCHES FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

No. in series —- Date. Page. No. in series —- Date. Page.
1

2

3

4

3

22

35

19

February 4, 1865 –

April 24, 1865 –      –

June 24, 1865 –      –

May 25, 1865 –       –

135

135

136

136

5

6

7

21

11

3

June 9, 1866 –    –

September 27, 1866 –

January 19, 1867 –

137

137

137

 

NEWFOUNDLAND.

DESPATCHES FROM THE GOVERNOR.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

16

23

27

35

40

64

69

December 27, 1864 –

January 27, 1865     –

February 23, 1865   –

April 13, 1865 –        –

April 19, 1865 –        –

July 11, 1985 –         –

August 19, 1865      –

138

139

139

140

141

142

143

8

9

10

11

12

13

75

91

97

103

115

117

November 14, 1865     –

February 20, 1866       –

March 21, 1866 –         –

May 4, 1866      –         –

July 10, 1866    –         –

August 7, 1866 –         –

144

145

148

149

150

151

 

DESPATCHES FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

4

9

15

20

22

31

36

January 21, 1865     –

January 27, 1865     –

March 17, 1865        –

May 11, 1865   –       –

May 12, 1865  –        –

June 24, 1865 –        –

August 4, 1865 –      –

154

154

154

155

155

155

156

8

9

10

11

12

13

42

52

40

43

45

8

September 30, 1865    –

December 20, 1865     –

March 23, 1866           –

April 14, 1866 –            –

May 25, 1866 –            –

August 30, 1866          –

156

156

157

157

157

157

 

 

APPENDIX.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Page

  1. Quebec Resolutions of October 10, 1861          –                    –                    –                    –                 –                   –                  –              158
  2. Resolutions, dated from Westminster Palace Hotel, London, December 1, 1866 –                 –                   –                  –              164

[Page 1]

CORRESPONDENCE

RESPECTING

THE PROPOSED UNION

OF

THE BRITISH NORTH AMERICAN PROVINCES.

CANADA.

Despatches from the Governor.

No. 1.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount Monck to the Right Hon. Edward

Cardwell, M.P.

(No. 203.)                                                                                                                                                                     Quebec, December 23, 1864.

(Received, January 9, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                                     (Answered, No. 5, January 13, 1865, p. 42.)

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge with feelings of much satisfaction the receipt of your Despatch (No. 93.*), of December 3, in which you convey to me the general approval by Her Majesty’s Government of the scheme of Union for the British North American Provinces agreed to by the Conference which met at Quebec in October last.

With regard to the two points upon which you have written, namely, that of the exercise of the Royal prerogative of pardon and the constitution of the Upper Chamber of the general Legislature, I shall only say at present that as respects the former I am in a position to state that it was never the intention of the Conference to interfere in the slightest degree with the constitutional prerogative of Her Majesty to select herself the person to whom she should entrust the duty of revising sentences pronounced by legal tribunals.

The resolution was introduced merely as a suggestion to meet a local difficulty resulting from imperfect means of communication during the winter months between portions of the proposed Union.

It is plain that this proposition could form no part of the Act which will be necessary in order to give effect to the proposed plan of union, and, in fact, the suggestion contained in it must be determined by the decision of the Queen, with whom alone rests the power of naming the person to shall be delegated the exercise of her prerogative.

With regard to the constitution of the Upper House of the general Legislature, it is apparent that the resolutions adopted by the Conference will be subjected to the action of many minds before they shall have become embodied in addresses from the Legislatures of the several Provinces.

I would suggest that we should adjourn the consideration of this subject until we see the form in which the resolutions will emerge from these discussions.

I have the honour to transmit for your information a copy of a communication which, in pursuance of the instructions contained in your Despatch, I have addressed to the Lieutenant-Governors of the Lower Provinces and to the Governor of Newfoundland.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                         (Signed)                         MONCK.

&c.                              &c.                             &c.

[Page 2]

Enclosure in No. 1.

SIR,                                                                                                                                                          Quebec, December 23, 1861.

REFERRING to my Despatches to you noted in the margin, I have the honour to transmit for your information a copy of a Despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies in reference to the resolutions adopted by the Conference which assembled at Quebec in October last to consider the propriety of effecting a Union of the Provinces of British North America, and also a copy of the answer with I have returned to this Despatch.

In this Despatch Mr. Cardwell desires me “to take immediate measures, in concert with the Lieutenant-Governors of the several Provinces, for submitting to their respective Legislatures this “project for the Conference.”

In pursuance of these instructions, I have the honour to inform you that I have summoned the Canadian Parliament to meet on Thursday, January 19th, 1865, when I propose to bring before both Houses of the Legislature the important subject referred to in Mr. Cardwell’s Despatch, in order that if the Legislature shall think fit an Address may be adopted to the Queen, praying Her Majesty to direct that steps may be taken for passing an Act of the Imperial Parliament to unite the Provinces of British North America on the basis laid down in the resolutions adopted by the Quebec Conference.

I shall feel much obliged after consulting your advisors on the subject, you will inform me what course you intend to pursue for the purpose of giving effect to Mr. Cardwell’s instructions.

                                                                                                                                                                                                       I have, &c.

(Signed)                   MONCK.

No. 2.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount Monck to the Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.

                  (No. 12.)                                                                                                                                                           Quebec, January 11, 1865.

SIR,                                                                                                                                                                               (Received, February 1, 1865.)

I HAVE the honour to enclose for your information a copy of a Despatch from the Governor of Newfoundland relating to measures for carrying out the proposed Union of the North America Provinces together with a copy of my answer.

                                                                                                                                                                                                 I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                                      (Signed)                      MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

Enclosure in No. 2.

My Lord,                                                                                                               Government House, Newfoundland, December 27, 1864.

I HAVE received from the Secretary of State a Despatch enclosing a copy of his two your Lordship. No. 9[.], of the 3rd […], […] which he states that it appears to Her Majesty’s Government that you should now take immediate measures, in concern with the Lieutenant-Governors of the several Provinces for submitting to the respective Legislatures the project of the recent Quebec Conference for the Confederation of the British North American Colonies.

2. I now communicate with you Lordship for the purpose of acquainting you that the Legislative Session of 1865 will be opened here on Friday the 27th January, when the Report of the Delegates will be laid before the Council and Assembly.

The postal service from Halifax to Newfoundland is limited to a monthly mail during the winter season. The next should leave Halifax on the 10th January, and if it should happen that your Lordship desires to afford me any information or recommendation on the important subject which is likely to engage so much of the time of the Legislature during the next Session, I should be glad to receive it by that opportunity.

3. From all that I have been able to gather in various quarters, I am of opinion that the proposal of the Conference will meet with little or no important opposition in this Colony, and it is possible that the necessary measures might be perfected her during the next Session by the present House of Assembly, which will expire in the spring. The chief measures is felt with regard to the effect of the Union upon the local tariff, which is much lower than that of Canada, and it is feared may be increased. If dread of any greatly disadvantageous alteration can be prevented, I should not anticipate serious difficulty in procuring a harmonious settlement of any other questions which may be raised.

4. It is possible, however, that the state of circumstances in Canada or the other Provinces may render it immaterial to press for any prompt decision in this in this Colony, and local causes may then make it inexpedient ; upon this point I shall be glad to be favoured with your advice, and I take this opportunity of assuring your lordship of my cordial co-operation in your efforts to complete an arrangement which I believe to be fraught with so great future advantage to this Colony, in common with the rest of the North American Possessions of the Crown.

I have, &c.

His Excellency the Right Hon. Viscount Monck,                                                                                          (Signed)          A. MESGRAVE.

Governor-General of Canada.

[Page 3]

Enclosure 2 in No. 2.

SIR,                                                                                                                                              Government House, Quebec, January 9, 1865.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of you Despatch of 27th December 1864, respecting the steps which it is advisable to take in order to carry into effect the instructions of the Secretary of State on the subject of the proposed Union of the British North American Colonies contained in his Despatch to me of the 3rd December 1864.

I have the hour to acquaint you that the Canadian Parliament is summoned to meet on the 19th inst., and it is intended by my Government to prose an address to the Queen from both branches of the Legislature, embodying the resolutions of the Quebec Conference, and praying Her majesty to cause a Bill to be introduced into the Imperial Parliament to enact the Union of these Colones on the basis of these resolutions.

I would suggest that a similar course should be adopted in Newfoundland.

With respect to the question of the customs tariff of the proposed Union, it is obviously impossible for the Government of our Province to give any pledge which would be binding upon the Government or Parliament of the Union ; but I am in a position to state that if the decision rested with the members of the present Canadian Administration, their desire would be to arrange the charges in the tariff so as to meet the views of all the members of the proposed Union.

I may express my own opinion that the course of action will be in a direction that will be satisfactory to your Legislature, and that no apprehension need be entertained in Newfoundland that a system of excessive import duties will be introduced.

I cannot conclude without expressing my gratification at the account you give of the State of public feeling in your Province on this important subject, and to beg of you to accept my best thanks for your hearty promise of co-operation with me in completing this great work, which had commended so auspiciously.

I have, &c.

Governor Musgrave, &c., &c.,                                                                                                                           (Signed)                     MONCK.

Newfoundland.

No. 3.

 

Copy of a DESPatCH from Viscount Monck to the Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.

(No. 25.)

Government House, Quebec,  January 19, 1865.

SIR,                                                                                                                                                                              (Received, February 3, 1865.)

I have the hour to enclose a copy of the speech with which I this day opened the session of the Provincial Parliament.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.                                                                                                              (Signed)                  MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

Enclosure in No. 3.

(Extract.)

HONORABLE GENTLEMAN AND GENTLEMAN,

AT the close of the last session of Parliament I informed you that it was my intention, in conjunction with my ministers, to prepare to submit to you a measure for the solution of the constitutional problem, the discussion of which has for some years agitated this Province.

A careful consideration of the general position of British North America induced the conviction that the circumstances of the times afforded the opportunity, not merely for the settlement of a question of provincial politics, but also for the simultaneous creation of a new nationality.

Preliminary negotiations were opened by me with the Lieutenant-Governors of the other Provinces of British North America, and the result was that a meeting was held at Quebec in the month of October last, composed of delegates from those Colonies representing all shades of political party in their several communities, nominated by the Lieutenant-Governors of their respective Provinces, who assembled here with the sanction of the Crown and at my invitation to confer with the members of Canadian ministry on the possibility of effecting a Union of all the Provinces of British North America.

This Conference, after lengthened deliberations, arrived at the conclusion that a Federal union of these Provinces was feasible and desirable, and the result of its labours is a plan of the constitution for the proposed Union embodied in a series of resolutions which, with other papers relating to the subject, I have directed to be laid before you.

The general design of a Union, and the particular plan by which it is proposed to carry that intention into effect, have both received the cordial approbation of the Imperial Government.

An Imperial Air of Parliament will be necessary in order to give effect to the contemplated Union of the Colonies, and I have been officially informed by the Secretary of State that Her Majesty’s ministers will be prepared to introduce a Bill for that purpose into the Imperial Parliament so soon as they shall have been notified that the proposed has received the sanction of the Legislatures representing the several Provinces affected by it.

[Page 4]

In commending your attention to this subject, the importance of which to yourselves and to your descendants it is impossible to exaggerate, I would claim for it your calm, earnest, and impartial consideration.

With the public men of British North America it now rests to decide whether the vast tract of country which they inhabit shall be consolidated into a state combining within its area all the elements of national greatness, providing for the security of its component parts, and contributing to the strength and stability of the Empire, or whether the several Provinces of which it is continued shall remain in their present fragmentary and isolated condition, comparatively powerless for manual aid, and incapable of undertaking their proper share of Imperial responsibility.

In the discussion of an issue of such a moment, I fervently pray that your minds may be guided to conclusions which shall redound to the honour of our Sovereign, to the welfare of Her subjects, and to your own reputation as patriots and statesmen.

No. 4.

Copy of a DESPatCH from Viscount Monck to the Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.

(No. 26.)                                                                                                                                                                     Government House, Quebec,

January 20, 1865.

SIR,                                                                                                                                                                              (Received, February 3, 1865.)

I HAVE honour to enclose a copy of a Despatch from the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, and of my answer, relative to the course to be adopted for the purpose of giving effect to the instructions conveyed to me in your Despatch of the 3rd December 1864, No. 93,* respecting the proposed Union of the British North American Provinces.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                                            (Signed)                      MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

Enclosure 1 in No. 1.

 

Lieutenant-Governor MacDONNELL to Lord MONCK.

MY LORD,                                                                    Government House, Halifax, Nova Scotia, January 9, 1865.

I have the hour to acknowledge receipt of your Lordship’s Despatch of the 23rd December, transmitting copy of the reply of Her Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State to your Lordship, expressing the views of the Queen’s Government on the resolutions adopted by the Quebec Conference.

2. In reference to the course which your Lordship suggests for the purpose of giving effect to the instructions of Her Majesty’s Government, viz., “to submit to the respective Legislatures the project of “the Conference,” I am in a position to state that this Government will take similar steps to those proposed to be taken in Canada, that is to say, when the papers and correspondence connected with the subject shall have been Raif before Parliament, which I have summoned to get on the 9th February, an address to Her Majesty will be moved but ht leader of the Government, praying Her Majesty to direct steps to be taken for passing an Act go the Imperial Parliament to unite the Provinces of British North America. The resolutions of the Quebec Conference will be suggested as the herbal basis of […], to be carried out in such a manner as may be judged by Her Majesty’s Government most compatible with the joint interests of the Crown and of these portions of the British Empire.

3. It is evident from the communication of the Right Honourable the Secretary of State that Her Majesty’s Government expects to be aided in the preparation of a bill embodying the suggestions of the Quebec Conference by deputations from the respective Provinces. It also appears to myself and the member of my Government that to avoid the probable multiplied divergence of opinion in each Legislature, inseparable from discussing a great variety of details in several independent Parliament’s, despite of a general agreement in the main object and principles of the general scheme, it is better for these Provinces to avail themselves of the friendly arbitrament of the Queen’s Government, and send delegates to consult with the latter during preparation of the proposed Imperial Bill. The peculiar views of each Legislature might, if necessary, find appropriate expression in instructions to the delegates from each.

4. This seems the wisest and most complete mode of disposing of all questions of prerogative as well as of all suggested amendments of the Quebec resolutions ; on all such points I and my Council feel that the simplest and most effectual mode of serving these provinces is to confide in the wisdom, discretion, and friendly disposition of the Imperial Government.

5. Any other course appears to this Government calculated to open a door to the renewal not of one but of as many conferences as there are distinct Legislatures. Such a course might possibly end in the indefinite adjournment of all union, and this Government would view with serious apprehension the grave consequences and general embarrassment to public business which might be caused by thus holding in suspense such important questions, and protecting their discussion so late as to prevent their settlement by Imperial legislation within the current year.

[Page 5]

6. I trust the above views of myself and of this Government coincide with those of your Lordship, and that all these Provinces may attain the early realization of their hopes of union by reposing a general confidence in the ability and wisdom of Her Majesty’s Government to arrange satisfactorily whatever details the Quebec Conference may have left incomplete.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Viscount Monck,                                                                                                       (Not signed).

&c.           &c.            &c.

Enclosure 2 in No. 4.

Lord Monck to Lieutenant-Governor MacDONNELL.

 

SIR,                                                                                                                                          Government House, Quebec, January 18, 1865.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch of the 9th instant, in reference to the course to be pursued in the several Provincial Legislature on the subject of the proposed Union, and I will at once lay it before my Executive Council for their consideration.

I have, &c.

Lieutenant-Governor Sir R. G. MacDonnell, C.B.,                                                      (Signed)                                         MONCK.

&c.                              &c.                              &c.

No. 5.

Copy of DESPATCH from Viscount Mock to the Right Hon. Edward CARDWELL, M.P.

                  (No. 28.)                                                                                                                                                      Quebec, January 25, 1865.

SIR,                                                                                                                                                                              (Received February 9, 1865.)

I HAVE the hour to enclose a copy of a Despatch from the Lieutenant-Governor of Prince Edward Island, and of my answer, respecting the time for assembling the Legislature of that Colony for the consideration of the Resolutions of the Quebec Conference.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                       (Signed)                                               MONCK.

Enclosure 1 in No. 5.

Lieut-Governor DUNDAS to Lord MONCK.

                                                                                                                              Government House, Prince Edward Island,

MY LORD,                                                                                                                                                                                   January 9, 1865.

I HAVE to acknowledge the recipe on the 7th instant, of your Lordship’s Despatch of the 23rd […], transmitting copy of a Despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and your reply thereto, on the subject of the resolutions adopted by the Conference which recently assembled at Quebec, to consider the propriety of effecting an Union of the Province of British North America.

I have, in accordance with your respect, consulted my advisors on the subject. It will be inconvenient for local reasons, that I should summon the Legislature of this Province before the 28th February; but I am prepared to do so if your Lordship is desirous of obtaining sooner the decision of this Legislature on this important question.

At the opening of the Legislature, I propose to bring the project of the Conference before both Houses, and to invite them to give their calm and dispassionate consideration to a subject of such manifest interest and importance to the future welfare of the Colony.

My ministers are anxious to meet, so far as they can the wishes of Her Majesty’s Government, and of your Lordship, as to the time of submitting this matter to the Legislature, and if the 28th February apparatus to your Lordship to be inconveniently late, I shall be glad if you will inform me of the latest date which will meet with your approval.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Viscount Monck,                                                                                          (Signed)                George Dundas,

&c.            &c.            &c.                                                                                                                                      Lieutenant-Governor.

Enclosure 2 in No. 5.

Viscount MONCK to Lieut-Governor DUNDAS

SIR,                                                                                                                                                                                   Quebec, January 25, 1865.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch of the 9th instant, in which you inform me that you decided to summon the Parliament of Prince Edward Island to meet on the 28th February, but that if I desire, in connection with the intention of submitting to its consideration the proposed Union of the British North American Provinces, that it should meet on an earlier day, you are prepared to meet my views in reference to this matter.

I have the honour to say in reply, I do not think any advantage would be gained by assembling your Parliment at an earlier day that that which you mention.

[Page 6]

I hope to transmit to you by an early opportunity the terms of the motion in which it is proposed by the Canadian Ministry to bring this important subject under the consideration of the Parliament of this Province.

Lieut.-Governor Dundas,                                                                                                                     I have, &c

&c.            &c.                                                                                                           (Signed)                   MONCK.

No. 6.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. EDWARD CARDWELL, M.P.

(No. 32.)                                                                                                                                                                           Quebec, January 26, 1865.

                                                                                                                                                                  (Received February 9, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                                   (Answered, No. 21, February 15, 1865, p. 12.)

I HAVE the honour to enclose copies of Addresses presented to me by the two Houses of the Legislature in answer to the speech from the Throne, and of my replies.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                         (Signed)                  MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

Enclosure 1 in No. 6.

To His Excellency the Right Honourable CHARLES STANLEY, Viscount MONCK, Baron MONCK, of Ballytrammon, in the County of Wexford. Governor-General of British North America, and Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Island of Prince Edward, and Vice-Admiral of the same, &c., &c., &c.

                                                                                                            (Extract)

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY:

We recall with satisfaction your Excellency’s statement at the close of the last session of Parliament, that it was your intention, in conjunction with your Ministers, to prepare and submit to Parliament a measure for the solution of the constitutional problem, the discussion of which has for some years agitated the Province.

We receive with earnest attention your Excellency’s announcement, that a careful consideration of the general position of British North America induced the conviction that the circumstances of the times afforded the opportunity, not merely for the settlement of a question of provincial politics, but also for the simultaneous creation of a new nationality.

We thank your Excellency for informing us that preliminary negotiations were opened by your Excellency with the Lieutenant Governors of the Provinces of British North America: and that the result was that a meeting was held at Quebec, in the month of October last, composed of delegates from those Colonies, representing all shapes of political party in their several communities, nominated but the Lieutenant-Governors of their respective Provinces, who assembled here, with the sanction of the Crown and at your Excellency’s invitation, to confer with the member of the Canadian ministry on the possibility of effecting a Union of all the Provinces of British North America.

We have learned with the deepest interest that this Conference, after lengthened deliberations, arrived at the conclusion that a federal Union of these Provinces was feasible and desirable, and that the result of its labours is a plan of constitution for the proposed Union, embodied in a series of resolutions, which, with other papers relating to the subject, your Excellency has directed to be laid before Parliament: and that the general design of a Union, and the particular plan by which it is proposed to carry that intention into effect, have both received the cordial approbation of the Imperial Government.

An Imperial Act of Parliament being necessary in order to give effect to the contemplated Union of the Colonies, this house is gratified to learn that your Excellency has been […] informed by the Secretary of State that Her Majesty’s Ministers will be prepared to introduce a Bill for that purpose into the Imperial Parliament, so soon as they shall have been notified that the proposal has received the sanction of the Legislatures representing the several Provinces affect by it.

And we assure your Excellency that this subject, which you have been pleased to commend to our attention, and the importance of which to ourselves and to our descendants it is impossible to exaggerate, shall receive from this House the calm, earnest, and impartial consideration which your Excellency claims for it.

We desire to convey to your Excellency a sense of the profound respect with which this House has received the assurance of your conviction that with the public men of British North America in now rests to decide whether the vast tract of country which they inhabit shall be considered into a State, combining within its area all the elements of national greatness, providing for the security of its component parts, and contributing to the strength and stability of the Empire : or whether the several Provinces of which it is constituted shall remain in their present fragmentary and isolated condition, comparatively powerless for metal aid, and incapable of undertaking their proper share of Imperial responsibility.

We unite with your Excellency in fervently praying that in the discussion of an issue of such moment, our minds may be guided to conclusions which shall redound to the hour of our Sovereign, and to the welfare of Her subjects.

[Page 7]

Enclosure 2 in No. 6.

Mr. SPEAKER and Gentleman of the Legislative Council.

         I THANK you for your address. I am convinced that you will apply yourselves to the consideration of the important matters that will be laid before you in a calm and dispassionate spirit.

Enclosure 3 in No. 6.

To his Excellency the Right Honourable CHARLES STANLEY, Viscount MONCK, Baron MONCK, of Ballytrammon, in the Country of Wexford, Governor-General of British North America, and Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Island of Prince Edward, and Vice-Admiral of the same, &c., &c., &c.

                                                                                                            (Extract.)

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY :

We have not ceased to bear in mind, that at the close of the last session of Parliament your Excellency graciously informed us that it was your intention, in conjunction with your Ministers, to prepare and submit to us a measure for the solution of the constitutional problem, the discussion of which has for some Yeats agitated this Province.

We receive from your Excellency, with the most profound attention, the announcement,—

That a careful consideration of the general probation of British North America induced the conviction, that the circumstances of the times afforded the opportunity, not merely for the settlement of a question of provincial politics, but also for the simultaneous creation of a new nationality :

That preliminary negotiations were opened by your Excellency with the Lieutenant-Governors of the other Provinces of British North America, and that the result was that a meeting was held at Quebec in the month of October last, composed of delegates from those Colonies, representing all shades of political party in their several communities, nominated by the Lieutenant-Governors of their respective Provinces, who assembled here with the sanction of the Crown and at your Excellency’s invitation, to confer with the members of the Canadian Ministry on the possibility of effecting a union of all the Provinces of British North America :

That this Conference, after lengthened deliberations, arrived at the conclusion that a federal Union of these Provinces was feasible and desirable, and the result of its labours is a plan of constitution for the proposed Union, embodied in a series of resolutions, which, with other papers relating to the subject, your Excellency has directed to be laid before us :

And that the general design of Union, and the particular plant by which it is proposed to carry that intentioned into effect, have both received the cordial approbation of the Imperial Government.

Inasmuch as an Imperial Act of Parliament will be necessary in order to give effect to the contemplated Union of the Colonies, we are gratified to learn from your Excellency that you have been officially informed by the Secretary of State, that Her Majesty’s Ministers will be prepared to introduce a Bill for that purpose into the Imperial Parliament, so soon as they shall have been notified the the proposal has received the sanction of the Legislatures representing the several Provinces affected by it.

Your Excellency may rest assured that in giving our attention to this subject, the importance of which, to ourselves and to our descendants, it is impossible to exaggerate, we shall bestow upon it our calm, earnest, and impartial consideration.

We receive with deference the expression of your Excellency’s conviction, that with the public men of British North America it now rests to decide whether the vast tract of country which they inhabit shall be consolidated into a State, combining within its area all the elements of national greatness, providing for the security of its component parts, and contributing to the strength and stability of the Empire ; or whether the several Provinces of which it is constituted shall remain in their present fragmentary and isolated condition, comparatively powerless for mutual aid, and incapable of undertaking their proper share of Imperial responsibility.

And we unite with your Excellency in the fervent prayer, that in the discussion of an issue of such moment, our minds may be guided to conclusions which shall redound to the hour of our Sovereign, and to the Welfare of Her Subjects.

Enclosure 4 in No. 6.

Mr. SPEAKER and Gentlemen of the Legislative Assembly.

                  I THANK you for this address. I am happy to hear they you re prepared to enter at once upon the discussion of the several important subjects that I have submitted to you.

No. 7.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. Edward CARDWELL., M.P.

(NO. 35.)                                                                                                                                                                    Quebec, January 30, 1865.

(Received, February 17, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                                 (Answered, No. 30. February 21, 1865, p. 12.)

I HAVE the honour to enclose a copy of a circular Despatch which I have this day addressed to the Lieutenant-Governors and to the Governor of Newfoundland.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                                   (Signed)                MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

[Page 8]

Enclosure in No. 7.

Viscount MONCK to Lieutenant-Governors.

SIR,                                                                                                                                                                          Quebec, January 30, 1865.

I HAVE the honour to transmit for your information a copy of the resolution which it is proposed by my Government to move in both Houses of the Legislature of this Province on the subject off the proposed Union of the British North American Provinces.

I also enclose, as printed by the Legislative Assembly, copies of correspondence that has been laid before both Houses of the Canadian Legislature.

I have, &c.

(Signed)              MONCK.

RESOLVED,

THAT an humble address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that She may graciously pleased to cause a measure to be submitted to the Imperial Parliament for the purpose of using those Colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island in one Government, with provisions based on the following resolutions which were adopted at a Conference of delegates from the said Colonies held at the city of Quebec on the 10th of October 1864.

(Here follow the resolutions verbatim.*)

No. 8.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. Edward CARDWELL., M.P.

(NO. 36.)                                                                                                                                                                        Quebec, January 30, 1865.

                                                                                                                                                (Received, February 17, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                                 (Answered, No. 32. February 25, 1865, p. 42.)

I HAVE the honour to enclose a copy of a circular Despatch which I have this day addressed to the Lieutenant-Governors and to the Governor of New Brunswick.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                                (Signed)               MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

Enclosure in No. 8.

Hon. A. H. GORDON to Lord MONCK.

MY LORD,                                                                                                                                                          Fredericton, January 23, 1865.

IN my Despatch of the 9th instant I informed your Lordship that, when I had consulted the members of my Council as to the steps most calculated to give effect to the resolutions of Quebec Conference, I would do myself the honour of again addressing your Lordship.

I have now accordingly the honour to inform your Lordship that it is my intention, with the advice of my Executive Council, immediately to dissolve the existing Legislature of this Province, and that the new Parliment will be summoned to meet towards the end of the month of March, when the question of the Confederation of the British North American Provinces will be immediately submitted for their consideration.

I have, &c.

The Viscount Monck,                                                                                                           (Signed).            ARTHUR II. GORDON.

&c.            &c.

No. 9.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. Edward CARDWELL., M.P.

(NO. 68.)                                                                                                                                        Government House, Quebec, March 10, 1865.

                                                                                                                                                (Received, March 24, 1865.)

    SIR,                                                                                                                                          (Answered, No. 18. March 29, 1865, p. 48.)

I HAVE the honour to enclose a copy of a circular Despatch which I have this day addressed to the Lieutenant-Governors and to the Governor of Newfoundland.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                               (Signed)              MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

[Page 9]

Enclosure in No. 9.

Governor MESGRAVE to Viscount MONCK.

MY LORD,                                                                                                                 Government House, Newfoundland, February 23, 1865.

I HAVE had the honour the receive by the mail, which arrived on the evening of the 21st, your Lordship’s Despatches noted in the margin, with their enclosures, having reference to the proposed Confederation of the British North American Provinces.

2. I have already, in my Despatch of the 27th January, acquainted you with the [course] it was proposed to take in this Colony for the purpose of giving effect to the instructions of the Secretary of State. In the debates which have taken place both the Council and the Assembly on the address in reply to the opening speech, and subsequently on the special subject of Confederation, it has become obvious, however, that although no attempt is made to obtain a decision adverse to a Union of the Provinces, a very strong disinclination exists, even on the part of those favourable to the Union, to pronounce any judgement upon the question during the present session.

The House will expire in May, and a general election for a new Assembly must take place in the autumn. It is urged that under any circumstances the matter id one which should be referred to the constituencies, and that in these it would be specially improper to attempt to force a hasty decision from the present Legislature just on the eve of its expiration.

3. I believe I am justified in stating that the project is gradually gaining ground in the estimation of the better informed members, both of the Legislature and the community, but a good deal of misapprehension on the subject prevails among a large number, which a little time for consideration and explanation would go far to remove. I entertain scarcely any doubt of the final adoption of the proposals of the Quebec Conference ; but I am advised, and it appears to myself, that in the present state of public feeling it would be unwise to press for a decision against the almost unanimous desire to defer it until the next session.

Such a course would probably only have the effect of exciting factious hostility, and retard the eventual settlement of the plan.

And it is, therefore, now proposed by the Government to agree to the postponement of a decision until the first session of the new Legislature, when the question shall have been submitted to the constituencies of the Colony.

I have, &c.

His Excellency the Right Hon. Viscount Mock,                                                                                     (Signed)           A. MESGRAVE.

&c.            &c.            &c.

No. 10.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. Edward CARDWELL., M.P.

(NO. 73.)

                                                                                                            Government House, Quebec, March 15, 1865.

                                                                                                                                                (Received, March 30, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                                           (Answered, No. 58. April 8, 1865, p. 43.)

I HAVE the honour to transmit an Address to Her Majesty, agreed to by the Legislative Council of this Province, praying that Her Majesty will be pleased to cause a measure to be introduced into the Imperial Parliament for the Union of the Provinces of British North America, on the basis of the resolutions adopted by the Conference of Delegates from those Provinces which met at Quebec in October of last year.

This Address to Her Majesty was brought up to me by the whole House, and an Address presented to me, of which I have the honour to transmit a copy, requesting me to take such steps as might appear to me most suitable for laying the Address to the Queen at the foot of the throne.     I have, therefore, the honour to request on the part of the Legislative Council of Canada, that you will present their Address to her Majesty.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                          (Signed)                 MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

Enclosure 1 in No. 10.

To his Excellency the Right Honourable CHARLES STANLEY, Viscount MONCK, of Ballytrammon, in the Country of Wexford, Governor-General of British North America, and Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Island of Prince Edward, and Vice-Admiral of the same, &c., &c., &c.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY,

We, Her Majesty’s dutiful and loyal subjects, the Legislative Council of Canada, in a Provincial Parliment assembled, beg leave to approach your Excellency with our respectful request that you will

[Page 10]

be pleased to transmit our Address to Her Majesty on the subject of the Union of Her Majesty’s Provinces of British North America in such a way as to your Excellency may seem fit, in order that the same may be laid at the foot of the throne.

(Signed)   U. J. TESSIER,

Legislative Council,                                                                                                                     Speaker of the Legislative Council.

Monday, 20th February 1865.

Enclosure 2 in No. 10.

 To the QUEEN’S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY.

MOST GRACIOUS SOVERIEGN,

WE, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Legislative Council of Canada, in  Provincial Parliment assembled, humbly approach Your Majesty for the purpose of praying that Your Majesty may be graciously pleased to cause a measure to be submitted to the Imperial Parliment for the purpose of uniting the Colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island in one Government, with provisions based on the following resolutions, which were adopted at a Conference of delegates from the said Colonies, held at the city of Quebec, on the 10th of October 1864.

(Here follow the Resolutions which will be found printed as an Appendix, page 158.)

Legislative Council, Monday 20th February 1865.

No. 11.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. Edward CARDWELL., M.P.

(NO. 74.)

                                                                                                            Government House, Quebec, March 15, 1865.

                                                                                                                                                (Received, March 30, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                                           (Answered, No. 58. April 8, 1865, p. 43.)

I HAVE the honour to transmit an Address to Her Majesty, agreed to by the Legislative Council of this Province, praying that Her Majesty will be pleased to cause a measure to be introduced into the Imperial Parliament for the Union of the Provinces of British North America, on the basis of the resolutions adopted by the Conference of Delegates from those Provinces which met at Quebec in October of last year.

This Address to Her Majesty was brought up to me by the whole House, and an Address presented to me, of which I have the honour to transmit a copy, requesting me to take such steps as might appear to me most suitable for laying the Address to the Queen at the foot of the throne.     I have, therefore, the honour to request on the part of the Legislative Council of Canada, that you will present their Address to her Majesty.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                             (Signed)              MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c.

Enclosure 1 in No. 11.

To the QUEEN’S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY.

 

MOST GRACIOUS SOVEREIGN,

WE, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Canada, in Parliment assembled, humbly approach Your Majesty for the purpose of praying that Your Majesty may be graciously pleased to cause a measure to be submitted to the Imperial Parliment for the purpose of uniting the Colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island in one Government, with provisions based on the accompanying Resolutions, which were adopted at a Conference of delegates from the said Colonies, held at the city of Quebec, on the 10th of October 1864.

(Here follow the Resolutions which will be found printed as an Appendix, page 158.)

Legislative Council,

Monday 20th February 1865.

[Page 11]

Enclosure 2 in No. 11.

To his Excellency the Right Honourable CHARLES STANLEY, Viscount MONCK, of Ballytrammon, in the Country of Wexford, Governor-General of British North America, and Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief in and over the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Island of Prince Edward, and Vice-Admiral of the same, &c., &c., &c.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY,

We, Her Majesty’s dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Canada, in Parliament assembled, beg leave to approach your Excellency with our respectful request that you will be pleased to transmit our Address to Her most Gracious Majesty, praying that Her Majesty may be graciously pleased to raise a measure to be submitted to the Imperial Parliment for the purpose of uniting the Colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island, in one Government, with Provisions based on the resolutions which were adopted at a Conference of delegates from the said Colonies, held at the city of Quebec on the 19th of October 1865, in such way as your Excellency may deem fit, in order that the same may be laid at the foot of the throne.

(Signed)   L. WALLBRIDGE,

Legislative Council,                                                                                                                                                                  Speaker.

Monday, 13th March 1865.

No. 12.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. Edward CARDWELL., M.P.

(NO. 161.)

                                                                                                                                                                  Quebec, August 14, 1865.

                                                                                                                                                (Received, August 28, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                              (Answered, No. 137. September 6, 1865, p. 46.)

I HAVE the honour to transmit for your information, copies of the papers* submitted to the Provincial Parliament relating to the Conference lately held in London between Her Majesty’s Government and the Ministers of Canada.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                                               (Signed)             MONCK.

&c.            &c.            &c

To his Excellency the Right Honourable Viscount MONCK, Governor-General of British North America, &c. &c.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY,

THE undersigned having, by Order in Council of 24th March 1865, been appointed a committee of the Executive Council of Canada to proceed to England and confer with Her Majesty’s Government on certain subjects of importance to the Province, sailed for England in April last ; and having discharged the duty entrusted to the and returned to Canada, we now beg to submit for your Excellency’s information, a statement of our proceedings while in London.

The circumstances under which this mission became necessary are doubtless fresh in your Excellency’s recollection. For a considerable time past, in view of the civil war going on in the United States, and the impossibility of anticipating what international questions might at any moment arise, Her Majesty’s Government felt it their duty from time to time to direct the attention of the Government of Canada to the insecure position of the Province in the event of disturbed relations unhappily resulting, and to urge the adoption of protective measures. In these communications it was not concealed that Her Majesty’s Government expected the people of Canada to assume more onerous military duties than they had previously horne. Your Excellency’s advisors were always prepared frankly to consider these proposals, and to submit for the approval of Parliament such measures as might be found just and reasonable. But they felt at the same time that to secure the hearty assent of Parliament and the country for any important changes in the military relations between the patents state the Colony, an explanation on the whole subject first […] so that a clear understanding as to the share of defence to be borne by each might be arranged […] all ground of irritating and hurtful reproach for alleged neglect of duty by the Colony, […]. In view also of the anticipated early union of all the British North American Colonies […] calculated to simplify the system of defence — the Government of Canada deemed it highly desirable that the settlement of this important question should be reserved for the action of the Government and Legislature of the new Confederation. Her Majesty’s Government concurred in these views.

In early part this year, however, events occurred of affairs. The conference at Fortress Monroe for the cessation of hostilities, the disturbances on the Canadian frontier, the imposition of the passport system,  the notice given by the American Government for a termination of the conviction restricting the naval armament on the lakes, and other events, tended to revive and deepen the feeling of insecurity ; and Her Majesty’s Government urged the immediate erection of permanent works of defence at Quebec and Montreal —the cost of the former to be borne by the Imperial Treasury, and of the latter by the people of Canada. Your Excellency’s advisors were most anxious to meet the wishes of Her Majesty’s Government, but they could not feel it their dirt to propose to Parliament a vote for defensive workers at Montreal while the defence of Upper Canada, on land and on the lakes, was provided for. The position of affairs was further complicated by the result of the New Brunswick elections, which postponed, at least for a time, the Union of the Provinces, and by

[Page 12]

the formal notice but he American Government for the termination, in March next, of the Reciprocity Treaty. It became evident that the time had arrived and could no longer be postponed, for a full and frank explanation with Her Majesty’s Government on the whole state of affairs ; and with that view an immediate mission to England, with your Excellency’s assent, was resolved upon. The state of the case was forthwith communicated to the Legislative Council and Assembly, which were then in session; and Parliament was shortly after prorogued on the business of the session, so soon as the delegates returned from Great Britain.

On arriving in England we lost no time in placing ourselves in communication with Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for the Colonies ; and a committee f the Imperial Cabinet, consisting of his Grace the […] Somerset, the Right honourable the Earl De Grey and Ripon, the Right Honourable William […] Gladstone,a Dan the Right Honourable Edward Caldwell, having been appointed to confer with us, negotiations were opened and continued at frequent interviews, up to the close of our mission.

The subject to which we first invited the attention of the conference was the proposed Confederation of the British North American Colonies. We reminded the Imperial Ministers how largely all the questions, with the discussion of which we were charged — and especially those of defence, foreign commercial relations, an internal communication — would be affected by the Union, and how greatly their satisfactory settlement would be facilitated by it. We explained the reasons that existed for obtaining the assent of all the Colonies to the Union at an early date, and the promise to which the Government of Canada stood pledged to proceed without delay with constitutional reforms for Canada alone, in the event of the larger measure […] to be obtained. We received at once from the members of the Imperial Cabinet assurances of their hearty approval of the Confederation scheme, and of their anxious desire to promote its early accomplishment by all the legitimate influence of the Imperial Government. In the discussion of the means to be adopted for effecting Confederation, we trust it is unnecessary to assure your Excellency that the idea of coercing the maritime Provinces into the measure was not for a moment entertained. The end sought was to ascertain in what manner the question of Union in all its hearings could be best brought under the fall and fait consideration of our fellow Colonists, and the grave responsibility urged upon them, which they would assume by thwarting a measure so pregnant with future prosperity to British America, so anxiously desired by the great mass of the people to be affected by it, and which had been received with such marked satisfaction by our fellow subjects throughout the British Empire. We received assurances that her Majesty’s Government would adopt every legitimate means for securing the early assent of the Maritime Provinces to the Union. In the course of these discussions, the question of the Intercolonial Railway came up as a necessary accompaniment of Confederation, when we sought and obtained a renewal of the promised Imperial guarantee of a loan for the construction of that work.

The important question of the future military relations between the mother country and Canada received earnest and grave consideration. Before entering on the discussion of details, we referred t the recent debates in the Imperial Parliment on the subject of Canadian defences, ad especially to the assertions confidently made by certain members of the House of Commons that Canada was incapable of efficient protections against in case ion from her inland border. We explained the unjust such statements tended to produce, and the necessity of our ascertaining, as a preliminary step to our discussions, whether or not they were well founded. We asked that a report on the whole subject of the defence of Canada, with plans and estimates, might be obtained from the highest military and navel authorities of Great Britain. Such a report was brained and communicated to us confidentially ; and we rejoice to say that it was calculated to remove all doubt as to the security of our country, so long as the hearts of our people remain firmly attached to the British flag, and the power of England is wielded in our defence.

On the part of Canada we expressed the desire that this plan for the defence of all parts of the Province should be taken as the basis of arrangement ; and that a fall and candid discussion should be had as to share of the cost that ought be borne respectively by the Imperial and Provincial […]. We expressed the earnest wish of the people of Canada to perpetrate the happy existing connection with Great Britain, ad their entire willingness to contribute to the defence of the Empire their full quota, according to their ability, of men and money. But we pointed out that if war should ever unhappily arise between England and the United States, it could only be an Imperial war, on Imperial grounds — that our country alone would be exposed to the horrors of invasion — and that our exposed position, far from entailing on us unusual burdens, should on the contrary secure for us the special and generous consideration of the Imperial Government. We explained, moreover, that though Canada continued to progress steadily and rapidly, it was a vast country, sparsely populated — that the difficulties of first settlement were hardly yet overcome — that the profits of our annual industry were to be found not in gloating wealth, but in the increased value of our farms an mines — and that, at this moment especially, from the failure of successive crops, the effects of the American civil war on our commercial relations, and the feeling of insecurity as to our position (greatly aggravated by statements of the defencelessness of the country in the British Parliment and by portions of the British press)— Canada was labouring under a temporary but serious depression. We pointed out that, while fully recognizing the necessity and prepared to provide for such a system of defence as would restore confidence in our future at home and abroad, the […] defence for British America was to be found in the increase of her populations as rapidly as people, and the husbanding of our resources to that end ; and without claiming it as a right, we […] to suggest that by enabling us to throw open the north-western territories to free settlement, and by aiding us in enlarging our canals and prosecuting internal productive works, and by promoting an extensive plan of emigration from Europe into the unsettled portions of our domain — permanent security would be more quickly and surely and economically secured than by any other means. We did not fail to point out how this might be done without cost or risk to the British exchequer, and how greatly it would lighten the new burden of defence proposed to be assumed at a moment of depression by the people of Canada.

[Page 13]

Much discussion ensued on all these points, and the result arrived at was, that if the people of Canada undertook the works of defence at and west of Montreal, and agreed to expend in training their militia, until the Union of all the Provinces was determined, a sum not less than is now expended annually for that service, Her Majesty’s Government would complete the fortifications at Quebec, provide the whole armament for all the works, guarantee a loan for the sum necessary to construct the works undertaken by Canada, and in the event of war undertake the defence of every portion of Canada with all the resources of the Empire.

The question having arisen as to the time and order in which these propositions should be submitted for the approval of the imperial and Provincial Legislature, it appeared that no action could be taken upon them during the present year ; ad it was therefore deemed inexpedient to complicate the Confederation question by changing the basis of the Quebec Conference resolutions, which might result from the present adoption of these propositions. The further consideration of the defensive works was accordingly deferred for the action of the Government and Legislature of the proposed British North American Confederation ; but the assurance of Her Majesty’s Government was at the same time given, that if circumstances arose to render an application would be received in the most friendly spirit.

On the subject of the American Reciprocity Treaty we entered into full explanations with the Imperial Ministers. We explained how advantageously the treaty had worked for Canada, and the desire of our people for its renewal ; but we showed at the same time how much more advantageously it had worked for American interests ; and we expressed our inability to believe that the United States Government seriously contemplated the abolition of an arrangement by which they had so greatly increased their foreign commerce, secured a vast and lucrative carrying trade, and obtained free access to the St. Lawrence and tot he invaluable fishing grounds of British America — and that on the sole ground that the Provinces has also profited by the treaty. We explained the immediate injury that would result to Canadian interests from the abrogation of the treaty ; but we pointed out at the same time the new and ultimately more profitable channels into which our foreign trade must, in that event, be turned and the necessity of preparing for the changes, and out readiness to discuss and favourably entertain any jus propositions that might be made for an extension on modification of its conditions ; we requested that the views of the American Government should be obtained at the earliest convenient date ; and that his Excellency Sir Fredrick Bruce should act in connect with the Canadian Government in the matter. The Imperial Government cordially ascended to our suggestions.

The important questions of opening up to settlement and cultivation the vast British territories on the north-west borders of Canada, next obtained the attention of the Conference. Your Excellency is aware that the desire of the Government of Canada for a satisfactory and final adjustment of this matter has been often formally expressed. In your Excellency’s Despatch of 19th January 1864, to the Colonial Secretary, the anxious desire of the Canadian Government was communicated “for some “speedy, inexpensive, and naturally satisfactory plan” for settling definitely “the north-western “boundary of Canada,” and the claim of Canada was asserted to “all that portion of Central British “America, which can be shown to have been in the possession of the French at the period f the “cession in 1763.”

In reply to this Despatch, Mr. Caldwell, on […] July 1864, requested to be informed whether the Government of Canada was prepared to assist in negotiations with the Hudson’s Bay Company, with the view of accepting any portion of the territory now claimed by that company, and providing the means of local administration therein ; and he suggested that if so prepared it would be desirable that some person daily authorized to communicate the views of the Canadian Government should be sent to England for that purpose.

On the 11th November 1864, a minute of Council was approved by your Excellency, in reply to Mr. Cardwell’s Despatch. It set forth that the Government of Canada was ready and anxious to co-operate with the Imperial Government, in securing the early settlement of the north-west territories, and the establishment of local government in it settled portions ; but that in its opinion the first step towards that end was the extinction of all claim by the Hudson’s Bay Company to proprietary rights in the soil and exclusive rights of trade. It suggested that it was for the Imperial Government, and not for the Government of Canada, to assume the duty of bringing to an end a monopoly originating in an English charter, and exercised so long under Imperial sanction ; but that when the negotiations were brought to a close, the Government of Canada would be ready to arrange with the Imperial Government for the annexation to Canada of such portions of the territory as might be available for settlement, as well as for the opening up of communications into the territory and providing means of local administration. Or should the Imperial Government prefer to erect the territory into a Crown Colony, the Canadian Government would gladly co-operate in the opening up of communication unto the territory, and the settlement of the country. The minute finally suggested that the Hon. President of the Council while in England would communicate more fully to Mr. Caldwell the views of the Canadian Government.

The negotiations that followed in this Despatch satisfied us of the impossibility of enforcing the end sought by Canada without long-protracted, vexations, and costly litigation. The Hudson’s bay Company were in possession, and that if time were their object, could protract the proceedings indefinitely ; and Her Majesty’s Government appeared unwilling to ignore pretentions that had frequently received […] recognition from Imperial authorities. Calling to mind, therefore, the vital importance to Canada of having that great fertile country opened up to Canadian enterprise, and the tide of emigration into it directed through Canadian channels — remembering also the danger of large grants of land passing into the country large masses of settlers unaccustomed to British institutions — we arrived at the conclusion that the quickest solution of the question would be the best for Canada. We accordingly proposed to the Imperial Ministers that the whole British territory east of the Rocky

[Page 14]

Mountains ad north of the American of Canadian lines should be made over to Canada, subject to such rights as the Hudson’s Bay Company might be Abe to establish ; and that the compensation to that company (if any were found to be due) should be met by a loan guaranteed by Great Britain. The Imperial Government consented to this, and a careful investigations guaranteed by Great Britain. The Imperial Government consented to this, and a careful investigation of the case satisfies us that the compensation to the Hudson’s Bay Company cannot, under any circumstances, be onerous. It is but two years since the present Hudson’s Bay Company purchased the entire property of the old company ; they paid 1,500,00/. for the entire property and assists,—in which were included in our arrangement, a very large claim against the United States Government under the Oregon Treaty—and ships, goods, pelts, and business premises in England and Canada valued at 1,023,569/. The value of the territorial rights of the company, therefore, in the estimation of the company itself, will be easily arrived at.

The results of our communications with the Committee of Her Majesty’s Government were placed, by Mr. Caldwell, in the form of a Despatch to your Excellency ; that document bears date the 17th June 1865, and has already reached your Excellency’s hands. It contains a correct statement of the result of the conference.

Although the subject was not specially referred to us, we did not fail to call the attention of the Colonial Minister to the anomalous position of foreigners who have settled in Canada and become naturalized subjects under our Provincial Statutes Mr. Cardwell at once admitted the hardship of the ease, and stated that it was the desire of her Law […] of the Crown for their opinions as to the best mode of doing so.

It will be gratifying to many devoted subjects of Her Majesty throughout British America, whose fears have been excited by the language too often heard of late years on the subject of Colonial connexion, that we received from Her Majesty’s Ministers the assurance that the British Government acknowledge the obligation of defending every portion of Canada with all the resources at its command.

Such, in brief, is the outline of our communications with Her Majesty’s Government, and we cannot conclude this report without gratefully acknowledging the distinguished consideration extended to us as the representatives of Canada, not only by the Minsters with whole we were brought more directly in contact, but by many eminent personages with whole we had the honour of conferring on the objects of our mission. To Mr. Cardwell we are especially indebted for unremitting kindness and attention. We are happy to believe that the result of our visit to England had been to inspire more just views as to the position and feelings of the Canadian people, and to draw closer the ties that have so long ad so happily attached our Province to the mother country.

(Signed)   JOHN A. MACDONALD.

GEO. ER. CARTER.

GEO. BROWN.

Quebec 12th July 1865.                                                                                                                       A. T. GALT.

No. 13.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.

(No. 183.)

                                                                                                            Government House, Quebec, September 20, 1865.

                                                                                                                                                (Received, October 5, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                              (Answered. No. 147, October 7, 1865, page 46.)

I HAVE the honour to transmit for your information, copies of a correspondence which i have had with the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, on the subject of further guarantees for the construction of the Intercolonial Railway, in the event of the Union of the Provinces.

I have, &c.

(Signed)               MONCK.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,

&c.            &c.            &c.

Enclosure 1 in No. 13.

Lord MONCK to Sir R. G. MACDONNELL.

SIR,                                                                                                                                                                               Quebec, September 9, 1865.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the recipes of your Despatch (No. 184) of 31st August, respecting the securities which you desire for the construction of the Intercolonial Railway in the event of the union of the British North American Provinces being completed.

In that Despatch you suggest that the Canadian Parliament should request the imperial Government so to frame the imperial Act of Parliament which shall give effect to the union of the Provinces as to secure the construction of the railway.

It appears to me and my Executive Council that this suggestion could only have been made under a misapprehension or in oblivion of what has been already done by the Canadian Parliament in reference to this subject.

[Page 15]

I take the liberty of calling your attention to the course adopted with respect to the Intercolonial Railway by the Government and Parliament of this Province.

In the last session of the Canadian Parliment an address was voted by both Houses to Her Majesty, praying “That she would be graciously please to cause a measure to be submitted to the Imperial Parliment for the purpose of uniting the Colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland in one Government, with provisions based on the accompanying resolutions, which were adopted at a conference of delegates from the said Colonies, held at the city of Quebec on the 10th day of October 1864.”

It is consequently manifest that all the resolutions adopted at the Quebec Conference were incorporated into the address to the Queen, and that Her Majesty was as much requested by the terms of this address to take measures for giving effect to each and all of them as if the request had been embodied in a separate address having distinct reference to each resolution.

I find the 68th resolution of the Quebec Conference expressed in the following terms:—“The general Government shall secure, without delay, the completion of the Intercolonial Railway from Rivere du Loup through New Brunswick to Truro in Nova Scotia.”

It would appear to me therefore that the Canadian Parliment, having already voted an address to the Queen, praying Her Majesty to take measures to secure the construction of the Intercolonial Railway, has done all that lies in its power to give assurance of its desire that the undertaking shall be completed : and I may add that after such a course i think it would be scarcely respectful to her Majesty to repeat the request by a further address.

As an additional evidence of the anxiety of Canadians that there should be no difficulty in the way of completing this works, or delay in the execution of it, I venture to remind you that it appears, from correspondence with the Secretary of State, already on your possession, that when a deputation of the Government of Canada was lately in England, in conference with Her Majesty’s Government, the members of that deputation voluntarily sought and obtained from the Imperial Cabinet a renewal of the engagement that, in the event of the success of the project for uniting the British North American Colonies the guarantee of the Imperial Government for the loan necessary for the construction of the railroad should be afforded.

The correspondence, of which I have furnished you with copies, and of which your present Despatch is an acknowledgment, affords further proof of the sentiments of the Canadian Government on this subject, and their willingness on the part of the Parliment of Canada to acquiesce in ant course which the imperial Government may adopt in order to secure, immediately on the Union of these Provinces, the commencement and prosecution of this important work.

I have, &c.

(Signed)             MONCK.

Lieutenant.-Governor Sir R. G. MacDonnell.

Enclosure 2 in No. 13.

Sir R. G. MACDONNELL to Viscount MONCK.

 

MY LORD,                                                                                                          Government House, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 31, 1865.

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordship’s Despatch of the 21st inst., enclosing a correspondence between yourself and the Secretary of State, in reference to the construction of the Intercolonial Railway.

That correspondence includes a Despatch from the Right Honourable the. Secretary of State, suggesting that more positive assurances from Canada of her readiness to construct that railroads would be satisfactory to the friends of the Confederation in the maritime Provinces. It also includes a minute of your Excellency’s Council, declaring the importance which they attach to the construction of the Intercolonial Railway.

3. So far as any suggestions from myself may have influenced the Secretary of State to transmit that Despatch. I must frankly say, that my object was to obtain some other security for the completion of the Intercolonial line, than that of the Canadian Government. I need scarcely say that I entirely rely on the good faith of the Canadian Government, and I know not who would question it : nevertheless the Parliament which has promised construction of the line must, in the event of Confederation, cease to exist, and the very member of your Government who repeat their assurances if its necessity may not be in office when the time for action arrives. It is therefore natural that those in the maritime Provinces who attach importance to the Intercolonial Railway should look beyond the existing Canadian Government to secure this leading inducement to Confederation being completed by the future Government and Parliament of the Confederate Provinces.

4. There are those who really desire Union if satisfied that the stipulated inducements will all be made good, and with who the difficulty of attaining any satisfactory assurance of the kind, has hitherto operated as a genuine reason gore opposing a scheme which they would otherwise support. There are also those who urge the difficulty of obtaining the requisite assurance as a pretext to excuse their own read hostility to the measure.

5. It seems to me that to satisfy the just expectations of the former, and deprive the latter of every excuse, is and ought where practicable to be a leading object of the policy of all friends of Confederation. Neither purpose can be attained by any amount of reiterated assurances from the present Canadian Government or Parliament, simply because the present may not be the Executive power in existence when the time arrives for carrying the undertaking into effect.

6. The only power that can be assumed as unalterable, and wholly reliable, as well as equally friendly to all concerned, is the British Government, and if the real wish and intention to the Canadian Ministry and Parliament be that the Intercolonial line shall be undertaken and completed in preference to any public works in Upper Canada or elsewhere, either now projected, or hereafter to be

[Page 16]

projected, it seems ways to request Her Majesty’s Government to frame the Imperial Act intended to legalise and a body the conditions of Confederation so as to reserve to Imperial authority and Imperial agents if necessary, ample means of completing the undertaking at the expense of the Confederacy. It is not for me to point out the special mode in which this might be accomplished : it is enough that it could be done effectually if earnestly desired.

7. Some such step taken during the present session of the Canadian Parliament would tend greatly to advance the cause of Confederation. Its omission and the impression which as gone abroad of the unwillingness of the Canadian Government to admit that a railway can be a condition of a constitution — though it may be made by Imperial Act as much an essential condition Theron as actual payment of purchase money is essential to the validity of other transactions — has prejudiced and is prejudicing the progress of confederation here and as I believe in New Brunswick also.

8. I would therefore very respectfully suggest that your Lordship might usefully endeavour to impress on your responsible advisors the expediency of early taking such measures as may deprive every one of all pretext for doubting the “[…]” fulfillment of the projected Union. Difficulties which cannot be avoided often […] the wisest and most expedient measures, but this is a difficulty which need last no longer than the Canadian Government and Parliament choose it to remain.

9. Your Lordship will regard this Despatch as expressing not merely my own views, but those of my Ministry.

I have .&c.

His Excellency the Right Hon.                                (Signed )              RICHARD GRAVES MACDONNELL.

Viscount Monck, Governor General,                                                                                                Lieut.. Governor.

&c.           &c.            &c.

No. 14.

Copy of Despatch from the officer Administering the Government to the Right Hon. Edward CARDWELL., M.P.

(No. 3.)

Montreal, September 30, 1865.

(Received, October 16, 1865.)

SIR,                                                                                                                                            (Answered. No. 150. October 18, 1865. Page 46.)

WITH reference to Lord Monck’s Despatch, no. 183,* of September 20th, enclosing copies of a correspondence between his lordship and the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, respecting further guarantees for the construction of the Intercolonial railway, I have the honour to transmit for your information a copy of another Despatch on the same subject, which I have received from sir Richard MacDonnell since lord Monck’s departure.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                   (Signed)            J. Mitchell., Lt,-Gen.,

&c.            &c.            &c.

 Enclosure in No. 14.

Sir R. G. MACDONNELL to Lord MONCK.

My LORD,                                                                                                    Government House, Halifax, Nova Scotia , September 18, 1865.

I HAVE the humour to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordship’s Despatch of the […] instant in reply to mine of the 31st […], suggesting the policy of providing additional security for the prompt construction of the Intercolonial railroad.

2. It is very gratifying to me to find that your Lordship regards the precious correspondence on the subject as a proof of the “willingness of the Canadian Government on the part of the Parliament of Canada to acquiesce in any course when the Imperial Government may adopt in order to secure immediately, on the Union of the Provinces, the commencement and vigorous prosecution of that important work.”

3. I must however observe, that as this is the first in which any direct allusion has been made to the willingness of Canada to abide by the views of the Imperial Government, apart from the strict text of the Quebec resolutions, I could not have been expected to have sooner divined such willingness. Iit is however enough that it is announced now.

4. I would also very respectfully submit that my Government is scarcely liable to the imputation of either “oblivion” or “misapprehension” of matters which had attained such recent and general notoriety as the renewed engagement by the delegates in […] a for a loan to construct the railway; and still less so, as to the mention of that project in the 68th Quebec resolution, of which your Lordship is so good as to remind me.

5. On the contrary, it was on the ground that many persons in these Provinces regard the terms of that very resolution as insufficient, whether eventually embodied or not in an Imperial Act, that I ventured to draw your Lordship’s attention to the subject.

6. I need to scarcely repeat that my suggestions from the first were offered not with a view to satisfy any doubts of my own or my Council. Two members of the latter body had been nominated by me Delegates to the Quebec Convention. They were therefore parties to the articles agreed on, and then, as now, they considered the assurance contained in the 68th resolution quite […] to satisfy all

[Page 17]

reasonable men; and believed, as they still believe, that the projected railway would be carried out promptly and in good faith.

7. Nevertheless the question is not what ought to satisfy myself or my council, but rather what it is polite `to do for the purpose of satisfying many influential opponents of confederation, who see, or think they see, or pretend they see in the Quebec an insufficient security for a work, held out as a leading inducement to confederation.

8. The 68th Quebec resolution is represented by them as relegating too entirely to the future “General Government,” and the future Ottawa Parliament, the execution of an important part of the future executive, of a different people and different Government, so as to foretel the mode in which the latter may execute a trust entirely consigned to them.

9. Now, although, in the event of confederation, the strong probability is that the leading statesmen of the present day would form that “General Government,” and as members of it, would desire faith-fully to carry out the pledges given by them as members of the quebec conference there is no absolute certainty in that prospect. On the contrary , there is just such a chance, however remote, of the first General Government being in a minority, as furnishes a pretext for those who are disposed to do so,to pretend that some rival project may obtain procedure in the new Parliament, notwithstanding the facilities offered by the guarantee of the imperial government for raising funds to construct the railway.

10. Now all the suggestions of myself and council from the first leave had but one object, viz., to cut the ground completely from under the feet of the class of objectors above alluded to, whether sincere in their objections or not.

11. In dealing with them I distinctly stated that it was “not for me to point out the special mode” in which additional security for construction of the railroad might be procured. Perhaps that object cannot be better attained than by the interpretation now given by your Lordship on the part of the Canadian Executive and Legislature to the previous correspondence.

12. Such an authentic announcement of the willingness of Canada to acquire in any course to secure the commencement and vigorous prosecution of the intended railway which may be taken by so friendly and suitable an arbiter as the imperial Government must be sufficient to terminate all doubt and caviling.

13. It is immaterial whether that willingness to abide by the judgement of Great Britain had been sufficiently implied before, or whether it be now for the first time introduced, as an admitted inference from previous correspondence. Provided it be clearly expressed, whether late or early, its authority is equally unquestionable.

14. For my own part I candidly say that, if the willingness of Canada to acquiesce in any course to be taken by Her Majesty’s government , had been expressed earlier I should not have troubled your Lordship on the subject. Permit me to add however that i cannot regret having elicited so satisfactory and decisive and exposition of the real intentions of the Canadian Government.

I have, &c.

His Excellency the Right Hon. Viscount                            (Signed)     RICHARD GRAVIS AC DONNELL,

Monck, Governor General,                                                                    Lient.-Governor.

&c.            &c.            &c.

No. 15.

Copy of DESPATCH from viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. EDWARD CARDWELL., M.P.

(No. 48.)                                                                                                                                                                           Ottawa, June 8, 1866.

(Received, June 25, 1866)

SIR,                                                                                                                                        (Answered No. 70, June 30, 1866, page 47.)

I HAVE honour to enclose a copy of the speech with which I this day opened the session of the Canadian Parliament.

I have, &c.

The Right. Hon. Edward Cardwell, M.P.,                                                                      (Signed)                     MONCK.

Enclosure in  No. 15

EXTRACT.

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN AND GENTLEMEN.

The position which the great question of the Union of the Provinces of British North America has assumed is now such as to induce the expectation that the measure will be shortly carried into effect. I therefore hope and believe that it will be found practicable during the present session to adopt such proceedings as may be necessary for completing the details of the scheme as regards to this Province, and i venture to express the confident expectation that the next parliament which will be held within those walls will not be continued to an assembly of the representatives of Canada, but will embrace those of all the Colonies of British North America.

I am happy to be able to congratulate you on the general prosperity which pervades all classes of the community in the province, and I pray that your councils may be guided by divine providence to secure that which is the true end of all government, the moral and material advancement of the great body of the people.

[Page 18]

No. 16.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount Monck to the Right Hon. the Earl of CARNARVON.

 

( No. 113.)                                                                                                                                                                      Ottawa, August 15, 1866

                                                                                                                                   ( Received August 19, 1866)

                                                                                                                             (Answered No.17, Sept. 5, 1866, p.48)

MY LORD,

I HAVE the honour to enclose a copy of the speech with which I this day closed the Session of the Canadian Parliament.

I have &c.

The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon,                                                                  ( Signed )          MONCK.

&c.             &c.         &c.

Enclosure in No. 16.

EXTRACT FROM SPEECH :

HONORABLE GENTLEMEN, AND GENTLEMEN,

I REJOICE that you have completed your part of the plan for the Union of the colonies of british North America, and I shall not fail to transmit to the Secretary of State for the colonies, for presentation to Her Majesty, your address on this subject.

In bringing to a close the last session likely to be held under the Art for the Union of the two Canadas, I congratulate the Parliament which that Law called into existence on the retrospect afforded by the events of the last quarter  of a century in this Province.

You can mark during that period the firm consolidation of your internal resources and foreign trade — the improvement and simplification of your laws — and above all the education which the adoption of the system of responsible government has afforded to your statesmen in the well-tried ways of the British Constitution.

The same principles, the application of which has been attended with so much advantage in the smaller Union, will be the guide of your course in the larger sphere of action on which you are now about to enter, and I fervently pray that the blessings which you have hitherto enjoyed may be given in larger measure to that new nationality of which you will form a part and the dimensions of which will entitle it to a high place amongst the powers of the world. 

No.17.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. the Earl of CARNARVON.

                  (No. 115.)                                                                                                                                                Ottawa, August 16, 1866.

(Received August 29, 1866.)

My Lord,                                                                                                                               (Answered, No. 11, August 31. 1866, p. 18.)

I have the honour to transmit your Lordship an Address to Her Majesty the Queen from the Legislative Assembly of Canada, praying that Her Majesty will be graciously pleased to cease a measure to be submitted to the imperial Parliament for creating Local Governments and Legislatures in Canada East and Canada West […] after the union of the British North American Colonies shall have been completed. I request that your Lordship will leave the goodness to lay this Address before the Queen.

I have &c.

The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon,                                                                  ( Signed )          MONCK.

&c.             &c.         &c.

Enclosed in No. 17.

TO THE QUEEN’S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY.

MOST GRACIOUS SOVEREIGN,

Why Your Majesty’s most dutifal and loyal subjects, the Commons of Canada in Parliament assembled, humbly approach your Majesty, for the purpose of paying that Your Majesty may be graciously pleased to cause a measure to be submitted to the Imperial Parliament, to provide for the Local Government and Legislature of Lower and Upper Canada, respectively, when the union of the Provinces of British North America is effected, with provisions based upon the accompanying resolutions, which were adopted by this House on Saturday the eleventh August, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six. All which we, the Commons of Canada, humbly pray Your Majesty to take into Your gracious and favourable consideration.

(Signed) L. Walbridge

Legislative Assembly Hall.                                                                                                                                                                      Speaker.

Saturday, 11th August 1866,

[Page 19]

(Sealed.)

RESOLUTIONS providing for the Local Government and Legislature of Lower and Upper Canada  respectively when the Union of the Provinces of British North America is elected.

Resolved:

  1. That by the 38th paragraph of the resolution of this House passed on the 3rd day of February 1865, for presenting an humble address to Her Majesty, praying that She may be graciously pleased to cause measure to be submitted to the Imperial Parliament for the purpose of uniting the Colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island in one Government, with provisions based on the resolutions which were adopted at a Conference of Delegates from the said Colonies, held at the city of Quebec on the 10th of October 1861, it is provided that “for each of “the Provinces there shall be an Executive Officer, styled the Lieutenant- Governor, who shall be “appointed by the Governor-General in Council under the Great Seal of the Federated Provinces “during pleasure, such pleasure not to be exercised before the expiration of the first five years except “for cause, such cause to be communicated in writing to the Lieutenant-Governor immediately after “the exercise of the pleasure as aforesaid, and also by message to both Houses of Parliament within “the first week of the first session afterwards,” and that by the 1st paragraph of the same resolution it is provided that “the Local Government and Legislature of each Province shall be constructed in “such manner as the existing Legislature of each such Province shall provide,” and it is further now resolved that in the opinion of this House the appointment of the first Lieutenant-Governor shall […] provisional, and that he should hold office strictly during pleasure.
  2. That under and subject to the Constitution of the Federated Provinces the executive authority of the LIeutenant Governor of Lower Canada and Upper Canada respectively shall be administered by each of such officers according to the well-understood principles of the British Constitution.
  3. The great Seal of the Province of Lower Canada and Upper Canada shall be the same or of the same design in each of the said Provinces as that used in the said Provinces respectively at the time of the existing Union until altered by the Local Government.
  4. That there shall be a Local Legislature for Lower Canada composed of two Chambers, to be called the Legislative council and the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada.
  5. That there shall be a Local Legislature for Upper Canada, which shall consist of one Chamber, to be called the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada.
  6. That the Legislative Council of Lower Canada shall be composed of 21 members, to be appointed by the Crown under the Great Seal of the Local Government, who shall hold office during life, but if any Legislative Councillor shall for two consecutive Sessions of Parliament fail to give his attendance in the saif Council his seat shall thereby become vacant.
  7. That the members of the Legislative Council of Lower Canada shall be British subjects by birth or naturalization of the full age of 30 years, shall possess a continuous real property qualification in Lower Canada of 4,000 dollars over and above all […], and shall continue worth that sum over and above their debts and liabilities.
  8. That if any question shall arise as to the qualification of a Legislative Councillor in Lower Canada the same shall be determined by the Council.
  9. That the speaker of the Legislative COuncil of Lower Canada (unless otherwise provided by the Local Parliament) shall be appointed by the Crown from among the members of the LEgislative Council, and shall hold office during pleasure, and shall only be entitled to a casting vote on an equality of votes.
  10. That each of the 24 Legislative Councillors of Lower Canada shall be appointed to represent one of the 2 […] Electoral Divisions thereof unintentioned in Schedule A. of the first chapter of the Consolidated Statutes of Canada, and such Councillor shall reside or possess his qualification in the division he is appointed to represent.
  11. That the legislative Assembly of Lower Canada shall be composed of the 65 members to be elected to represent the 65 Electoral Divisions into which Lower Canada is now divided under chapter 2 of the Consolidated Statutes of Canada, chapter 75 of the Consolidated Statutes for Lower Canada, and the Act 23 Vieteria, chapter 1, or of my other Aet amending the same in force at the time when the Local government shall be constituted, as well for representation in the Local Legislature thereof as in the House of Commons of the Federated Provinces : Provided that it shall not be lawful to present to the LIeutenant-Governor for assent any Bill of the Legislative Council and Assembly of Lower Canada by which the limits of the electoral divisions mentioned in the schedule hereto […] marked A. may be altered unless the second and third readings of such Bill in the Legislative Assembly shall have been passed with the concurrence of the majority of the members for the time being of the said Legislative Assembly representing the electoral divisions mentioned in said schedule marked A. and the assent shall not be given to such Bill unless and address has been presented by the Legislative Assembly to the LIeutenant-Governor that such Bill has been so passed.
  12. That the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada shall be composed of […] to be elected to represent the 2 consitiuneries in Upper Canada, such consitiuneries being identical, whether for representation in the Local Legislative Assembly or for representation in the HOuse of Commons of the Federal Provinces, and which consitiuneries shall consist of the divisions and be bounded as is provided in the schedule hereto annexed marked ll.
  13. That until other provisions are made the the Local Legislature of Lower and Upper Canada respectively, changing the same in either of the said Provinces, all the laws which at the date of the proclamation constituting the separate Provinces of Lower Canada and of Upper Canada shall be in force in each of the saif Provinces respectively, relating to the qualification and disqualification of any person to be elected or to sit or vote as a member of the Assembly of the Province of Canada, and relating to the qualification or disqualification of voters, and to the […] to be taken by voters, and to returning officers and their powers and duties, and relating to the proceedings at elections, and to the period during which such elections may be continued, and relating to the trial of controverted elections and the proceedings incident thereto, and relating to the vnenting of the seats of members, and to the

[Page 20]

issuing and execution of new writs in case of any seated being vacated otherwise than by a dissolution, shall respectively apply to elections of members to serve in the saif the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada and in the said the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada.

  1. That the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada and the Legislative Assembly Of Upper Canada respectively shall continue for four years from the day of the return to the writes for choosing the sme and no longer, subject nevertheless to either the said the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada or the said the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada being sooner prorogued or dissolved by the Lieutenant-Governor of either the said Provinces respectively.
  2. That there shall be a session of the Legislature of each of the said Provinces once at least every year, so that a period of 12 months shall not intervene between the last sitting of the Local Legislature in one session and the first sitting thereof in the next session.
  3. That is expedient that any Act of the Imperial Parliament which may be passed for the Union of the Colonies of British North America should contain a provision that the division and adjustment of the debts, credits, liabilities, properties, and assets of the Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada should be referred to the arbitrannent of three arbitrators, on to be chosen by the Local Government of Upper Canada, the other by the Local Government of Lower Canada, and the third by the General Government: it being further provided that the selection of the arbitrators shall not take place until after the General Parliament for British North America and Local Legislatures for Upper and Lower Canada have been elected. And that the third arbitrator shall not be a resident in either Upper of Lower Canada.

SCHEDULE A.

Electoral Divisions in Lower Canada referred to in the above Resolutions.

.

Comtimes of Pontiac.                                                                     Counties of Shefford.

Ottawa.                                                                                              Stansted.

Argenteuil.                                                                                        Compton.

Huntingdon.                                                                                    Wolfe & Richmond.

Missisquoi.                                                                                       Megantie.

Brome.                                                                             Town of Sherbrooke.

SCHEDULE B.

ELECTORAL DIVISIONS of UPPER CANADA.

Divisions to stand with their present Boundaries.

Counties of Prescott, Glengarry, Stormont, Dundas, Russell, Carleton, Prince Edward, halton, and Essex.

Ridings of counties: –Lanark North, Lanark South, Leeds and Grenville North Riding, South Riding Leeds, South Riding Grenville, Northumberland East, Northumberland West (less South Monaghan), Durham East, Durham West, Ontario North, Ontario South, York East, York West, York North, Wentworth North, Wentworth South, Elgin East, Elgin West, Waterloo North, Waterloo South, Brant North, Brant South, Oxford North, Oxford South, Middlesex East Riding.

Cities and towns: — Toronto East, Toronto West, Hamilton, Ottawa, Kingston, London, Brockville with the township of Elizabethtown. Niagara with the township of Niagara, Cornwall with the township of Cornwall.

New and altered Electoral Divisions.

District of Algoma.

County of Bruce divided into two ridings, to be called respectively the North and South Ridings.

The North Riding shall consist of the townships of Bury, Lindsay, Eastnor, Albemarle, Amahel, Aram, […], Elderslie, and Sangreen. And the village of Southampton.

The South Riding shall consist of the townships of Kineardine (including village), Greenock, Brant, Huron, Kinloss, Culross, and Carrick.

The county of Huron divided into two ridings, to be called respectively the North and South RIdings:–

The North Riding shall consist of the townships of Ashtields, Wawanosh, Turnberry, Howick, Morris, Grey, Colborne, Hullett including the village of Clinton. Md McKillop.

The South Riding shall consist of the town of Goderich and the townships of Goderich, Tuckersmith, Stanley, Hay, Usborne, and Stephen.

The county of Middlesex divided into three ridings, to be called respectively the North, West, and East Ridings:

The North Riding shall consist of the townships of McGillivray and Biddulph (taken from the county of Hyron), and WIlliams East, WIlliams West, Adelaide, and Lobo.

The West Riding shall consist of the townships of Delaware, Carradoe, Metcalfe, Mosa, and Ekfrid, and the village of Strathroy.

The East Riding shall consist of the townships now embraced therein, and be bounded as it is at present.

The county of Lambton shall consist of the townships of Bosanquet, Warwick, Plympton, Sarnia, Moore, Enniskillen, and Brooke, and the town of Sarnia.

The county of Kent shall consist of the townships of Chatham, Dover, East Tilbury, Rommey, Raleigh, and Harwich, and the town of Chatham.

The country of Bothwell shall consist of the townships of Sombra, Dawn, and Eupheunia (taken from the county of Lambton). And the townships of Zone, Camdett with the Gore thereof, Orford, and Howard (taken from the county of Keut).

[Page 21]

The county of Grey divided into two ridings, to be called respectively the South and North Ridings:–

The South Riding shall consist of the townships on Bentinck, Glenelg, Artemisia, Osprey, Normanby, Egremont, Proton, and Melancthon.

The North Riding shall consist of the townships of Collingwood, Euphrasia, Holland, Saint Vincent, Sydenham, Sullivan, Derby, and Keppel, Sarawak, and Broken, and the town of Owen Sound.

The county of Perth divided into two ridings, to be called respectively the South and North Ridings:–

The North Riding shall consist of the townships of Wallace, Elma, Logan, Elliee, Mornington, and North Easthope, and the town of Stratford.

The South Riding shall consist of the townships of Blanchard, Downie, South Easthope, Fullarton, Hibbert, and the villages of Mitchell and Ste. Marys.

The county of Wellington shall be divided into three ridings, to be called respectively North. South. And Centre Ridings :–

The North RIding shall consist of the townships of Amaranth. Arthur. Luther, Minto, Maryborough, Peel, and the village of Mount Forest.

The Centre Riding shall consist of the townships of Garafraxa, Erin, Eramosa, Nichol, and Pilkington, and the villages of Fergus and Elora.

The South Riding shall consist of the townships of Charlotteville, Houghton, Walsingham and Woodhouse, and with the Gore thereof.

The North RIding shall consist of the Townships of Middleton, Townsend, and Windham, and the town of Simcoe.

The county of Haldimand shall consist of the townships of ONeida, Seneca, Caguya North, Cayuga South, Rainham, Walpole, and Dumn.

The county of Monck shall consist of the townships of Camborough and Moulton and SHerbrooke, and the village of Dunville (taken from the country of Haldimand), the townships of Caistor and Gainsborough (taken from the county of Lincoln), and the townships of Pelham and Waintleet (taken from the county of Welland).

The county of LIncoln shall consist of the townships of CLinton, Grantham, […], and Louth, and the town of St. Catharines.

The county of Welland shall consist of the townships of Bertie, Crowland, Humberstone, Stamford, Thorold, and Willoughby, and the villages of Chippeway, Clifton, Fort Erie, Thorold, and Welland.

The county of Peel shall consist of the townships of Chinaguancousy, Toronto, and the Gore of Toronto, and the villages of Brampton and Streetsville.

The county of Cardwell shall consist of the townships of Albion and Caledon (taken from the county of Peel). And the townships of Adjala and Mono (taken from the county of Simcoe).

The county of Simcoe divided into two ridings, to be called respectively the South and the North Ridings :–

The South Riding shall consist of the townships of West Gwillimbury, Tecumseth, Innisfil, Essa, Tossorontio, Mulmur, and the village of Bradford.

The North RIding shall consist of the townships of Nottawasaga, Summidale, Vespra, FLos, Oro, Medonte, Orillia and Matebedash, Tiny and Tay, Balaklava and Robinson, and the towns of Barrie and Collingwood.

The county of Victoria divided into two ridings, to be called respectively the South and North Ridings:–

The South RIding shall consist of the townships of Ops, Mariposa, Emily Verulam, and the town of Lindsay.

The NOrth RIding shall consist of the townships of Anson, Besley, Carden, Dalton, Digby, Eldon, Fenelon, Hindon, Laxton, Lutterworth, Macaulay, and Draper, Sommerville, and Morrison, Muskoka, Monek and Watt (taken from the county of Simcoe), and any other surveyed townships lying to the north of the said North Riding.

The county of Peterborough divided into two ridings, to be called respectively the West and East Ridings:–

The West Riding shall consist of the townships of South Monaghan (taken from the county of Northumberland), North Monaghan, SMith and ENnismore, and the town of Peterborough.

The East Riding shall consist of the townships of Asphodel, Belmonth and Methuen, Douro, Dummer, Galway, Harvey, Minden, Stanhope and Dysart, Otonabee, and Snowden, and the village of Ashburnham, and any other surveyed townships lying to the north of the said East Riding.

The county of Hastings divided into three ridings, to be called respectively the West, East, and NOrth RIdings:–

The West riding shall consist of the townships of South Monaghan (taken from the county of Northumberland), North Monaghan, Smith and Ennismore, and the town of Peterborough.

The East Riding shall consist of the townships of Asphodel, Belmont, and Methren, Douro, Dummer, Galway, Harvey, Minden, Stanhope and Dysart, Otonabee, and Snowden, and the village of Ashburnham, and any other surveyed townships lying to the north of the said East Riding.

The county of Hastings, divided into three ridings, to be called respectively the West, East and North RIdings:–

The West Riding shall consist of the town of Belleville, the township of Sydney, and the village of Trenton.

The East Riding shall consist of the townships of THurlow, Tyendinaga, and Hungerford.

The North RIding shall consist of the townships of Rawdon, Huntingdon, Madoe, Elzevir, Tudor, Marmora, and Lake, and the village of Stirling, and any other surveyed townships lying to the north of the said North Riding.

                  The county of Lennox shall consist of the townships of RIchmond, Adolphustown, North Fredericksburgh, South Fredericksburgh, Ernestown, and Amherst Island, and the village of Napapnee.

The county of Assington shall consist of the townships of Canden, Protland, Shulield, Hinchinbrook, Kaladar, Kemebee, Olden, Oso, Angelsen, Barrie, Clarendon, Palwerston, Ellingtham, Abinger, Miller, Canonto, Denhigh, Loughborough, and Bedford.

The county of Frontenac shall consist of the townships of Kingston, Wolfe Island, Pittsburg and Bowe Island, and Storrington.

[Page 22]

The county of Renfrew divided into two ridings, to be called respectively the South and NOrth Ridings:–

The South RIding shall consist of the townships of McNab, Bagot, Blithfield, Broungham, Horton, Admaston, Grattan, Matawatehan, Griflith, Lyondoch, Radelife, Brudenell, Sebastopol, and the villages of Arnprior and Renfrew.

The North Riding shall consist of the townships of Ross, Bromley, Westmeath, Stafford, Pembroke, Wilherforce, Alive, Petawawa, Buchanan, South Algona, North Algona, Fraser, McKay, Wylie, Rolph, Head, Maria, Clara, Haggerty, Sherwood, Burns and Richards, and any other surveyed townships lying north-westerly of the said North RIding.

Clerk’s Office, Legislative Assembly,                                                                                              Attest,

August 18, 1866                                                                                                                                    WM. B. LINDSAY,

Clerk, L.A.

No.18.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. the Earl of CARNARVON.

               (No.116.)                                                                                                                                                             Ottawa, August 16, 1866.

                                                                                                                                                (Received August 29, 1866.)

My Lord,                                                                                                                                         (Answered, No. 4 August 31, 1866, page 48.)

I HAVE the honour to transmit to your Lordship an Address to Her Majesty the Queen from the Legislative Council of Canada, praying that Her Majesty will be graciously pleased to cause a measure to be submitted to the Imperial Parliament for creating Local Governments and Legislatures in Canada East and Canada West respectively, after the union of the British NOrth American Colonies shall have been completed. I request that your Lordship will have the goodness to lay this address before the Queen.

The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon,                                                                                                                                 I have, &c.

&c,           &c,           &c,                                                                                                                                          (Signed)      MONCK.

Enclosure in No. 18.

A Sa très-Excellente Majesté  la Reine.

TRÉS-GHACIEESE SOUVERAINE,

Nous les très-fidèles et loyaux sujeets de Votre Majesté, le Counsed Législatif du Canada, rénnis en Parlement Provincial, approchous humblement de Votre Majesté, pour prier Votro Majesté de vouloir bien gracieusement faire sou[…] au Gouvernement Imperial […] mesure pour ereer un Gouvernement local et une Législature locale pour le Baset le Hant Canada respectivement, après que l’Union des Provinces de l’Amérique Britannique du Nord aura été consommée, avec des [incomplete french portion page 22-25]

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No. 19.

Copy of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. The Earl of CARNARVON.

                  (NO. 147.)                                                                                                                             Quebec, September 25, 1866.

My LORD,                                                                                                                                             (Received, October 10, 1866.)

REFERRING to your Lordship’s Despatch, No. 39, * of the 31st […], i have the honour to transmit for your Lordship’s information an approved Minute of the Executive Council of this Province, stating the course which is proposed to be adopted by the Canadian Delegates on the subject of Union about proceeding to England, and the reasons on which that course is founded.

I beg leave to add the expression of my own opinion that the leading members of my Administration ought not to leave the Province before the time mentioned in this minute.

The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon,                                                                           I have, &c.

&c.           &c.           &c.                                                                                   (Signed)                     MONCK.

Enclosure in No.10.

COPY of a REPORT of a Committee of the Honourable the Executive Council, approved by His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the 2[…] September 1866.

THE Committee have had before them a Despatch, No.30, dated 31st August 1866, from the Right Hon. the Secretary of State for the Colonies. Stating that the Nova Scotia and New Brunswick delegates have been now for some weeks in England with a view to the discussion of the various questions relative to the Confederation of the British North American Provinces, and have repeatedly inquired of him the period by which the Canadian Colleagues may be expected.

That he shall be glad to be informed at the earliest possible date of the course which it is proposed by them to adopt.

His Lordship states that any unnecessary delay in the settlement of this question is very undesirable, and that also the prolonged detention of the delegates now in England is attended with much inconvenience to them and to the Governments of which they are members.

That if any appearance of impending Fenian disturbance should render it unfit for your Excellency to quit your post, or if the same causes should make the delegates feel that they cannot all of them leave the Province, it might deserve their consideration whether some of their number could repair at once to England to enter into the proposed discussion.

The Committee would respectfully state for the information of the Lord Carnarvon that the Canadian Parliament as its first Session in 1865, after the meeting of the Quebec Conference, adopted Resolutions

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approving the Scheme of Union proposed by that Conference, but that the Legislature of NOva Scotia declined to approved of that scheme, or to adopt resolutions in favour of an union of the Provinces until the spring of the present year, and the LEgislature of New Brunswick did not adopt such resolutions until the latter part of the month of July.

That so soon as it appeared probable that the Nova Scotia and New Brunswick would assent to a Scheme of Confederation, the Canadian Parliament was summoned, and measures to provide for the local Governments, which under the Quebec Scheme were required to be adopted by the existing Legislatures of the respective Provinces, were submitted for its consideration.

That while these measures were before Parliament, it was proposed by the Governments of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, that Delegates from the three Provinces should assemble in ENgland about the 1st of August, with the view of discussing and agreeing to a BIll for Confederation, to be submitted to the Imperial Parliament, which it was supposed would still be in Session.

That although the Canadian Government doubted that any measures based on the REsolutions of the QUebec Conference, could be prepared and carriers through the Imperial Parliament at so late a period of the Session, they promised to advise your Excellency to send a delegation of their number to England, by the seamer of the 21st July, if the progress of legislation and the state of public business would permit.

That before the date mentioned, and before the Delegates for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick had sailed for England, your Excellency received information which convinced your Excellency that is would not be possible to carry through Parliament at its then Session, any BIll for the COnfederation of the British North American Provinces.

That shortly afterwards and before the Delegates had left for England, your Excellency received notice of the resignation of Mr. Cardwell and his colleagues, and the accession of a new Government. That in view of these circumstance your Excellency was advised to inform the Governors of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick and your Excellency was advised did inform them that as it was evident that no measure for Confederation could be prepared and carried through Parliament in the Session then about to close, the Canadian Delegates would not leave Canada at the time stated.

That the prorogation of the Imperial Parliament on the 12th of August proved that the apprehensions of the Canadian Government were well founded. If, therefore, the Delegates from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick had postponed their departure as they were requested to do, they would not have suffered the inconvenience to thich Lord Carnarvon refers.

The Committee respectfully submit that it would not be expedient for any of the leading members of the Canadian Government to proceed to England while the Province is threatened with invasion by a formidable body of Fenian marauders from the United States.

The Committee believes that by the close of navigation this danger will be passed; or, if not, that such preparations will have been made to meet it that no apprehension need be felt for the result.

The Committee are further of opinion that as the next Session of the Imperial Parliament will not probably be held before February 1867, ample time will be afforded for the discussion of any question that may arise between the representatives of the Provinces and the Imperial Government if the Delegates assemble in England about the 20th of November.

They would, therefore, respectfully recommend your Excellency to inform lord Carnarvon that the following gentlemen have been appointed by your Excellency, viz.: Hon. JOhn A. Macdonald, Hon. Geo. E. Cartier, Hon. A. T. Galt, Hon. Wm. McDougall. HOn. W. P. HOwland, and HOn. H. L. Langevin, and such other gentlemen as may be hereafter named to the delegation on behalf of Canada, and that it is their intention to leave Canada for England on the 7th day of November next.

Certified,

W. A. HEMSWORTH,

Asst. C. E. C.

No. 20.

COPY of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. The Earl of CARNARVON.

       (NO. 150.)                                                                                                                                                         Quebec, September 28, 1866.

                                                                                                                                                                  (RECEIVED October 19, 1866.)

                  MY LORD,                                                                                                                 (Answered, No. 80, October 18, 1866, page 50.)

                                    I HAVE the honour to transmit herewith a copy of a telegraphic message which i addressed to your Lordship on the 24th instant.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon,                                                                                          (Signed)                     MONCK.

&c.           &c.           &c.

Enclosure in No. 20.

Lord Carnarvon, London.

                                                                        Quebec, September 24, 1866

                  All the Canadian Delegates intend sailing for England the 7th of November.

MONCK.

No. 21.

COPY of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. the Earl of CARNARVON.

                                    (No. 152.)                                                                                                            Quebec, October 1, 1866.

MY LORD,                                                                                                                          (RECEIVED October 23, 1866.)

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordships Despatch, No. 50, * of September 14th, respecting the departure for England of the Canadian Delegates on the Union question.

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My Despatch, No. 147, * of September 25th, will have informed your Lordship of the time fied by the Canadian Ministers for going to England, and of the reasons why a partial representation from Canada could not, in their opinion, be attended with any practical results.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon,                                                                           (Signed)               MONCK.

&c.           &c.           &c.

No. 22.

COPY of a DESPATCH from VIscount MONCK to the Right Hon, The Earl of CARNARVON.

                  (Separate.)                                                                                                                                     Quebec, November 3, 1866.

                                                                                                                              (Received November 21, 1866.)

MY LORD,                                                                                                                      (Answered. No. 100, November 22, 1866, page 50)

I BEG leave to introduce to your Lordship the HOnourable William Macdougall, Provincial Secretary of this Province, and the HOnourable HEctor Langevin, Postmaster-General, who are about to proceed to England as two of the delegates nominated by the Executive Council of Canada to consult with your Lordship and the delegates from the Provinces of NOva Scotia and New Brunswick on the subject of the union of British North America.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon,                                       (Signed)              MONCK.

&c.           &c.           &c.

No. 23.

COPY of a DESPATCH from Viscount MONCK to the Right Hon. the Earl of CARNARVON.

Quebec, November 23, 1866.

                                                                                                                              (Received November 21, 1866)

MY LORD,                                                                                                                          (Answered. No. 104. November 23, 1866. Page 50)

REFERRING to your Lordship’s Despatch, No. 63, * of September 26th and enclosure, I have the honour to transmit for your information a copy of an approved Minute of the Executive council of this Province on the subject of that Despatch.

In obedience to your Lordship’s instructions i have already transmitted a copy of this Minute to the Lieutenant-Governor of Prince Edward Island.

I have, &c.

The Right Hon. the Earl of Carnarvon,                                                                         (Signed)                  MONCK

&c.           &c.           &c.

Enclosure in No. 23

COPY of a REPORT of a COMMITTEE of the Honourable the Executive Council, approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 22nd October 1866.

                  The Committee of Council have had under consideration the Despatch of the Colonial Secretary to Your Excellency of the 26th September last, and the accompanying resolution of the delegates from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, and they now beg leave to report.

That the resolution referred to is as follows: —

“At a meeting of the Delegates from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick held at the Alexandra Hotel, London, on the 22nd day of September 1866, all being present expert the Hon. Mr. Wihnot. It was unanimously resolved that inasmuch as the co-operation of Prince Edward Island, though not indispensable to a union of the British North American Provinces, is on many accounts very desirable and as the settlement of the land question which has so long and so injuriously agitated that Colony, would be attended with great benefit, and at the same time place the local government of the island, by the possession of the proprietary lands, more on a footing with the other Provinces which have Crown Lands and minerals as a source of local revenue.

“Therefore resolved —

“That in case the Legislature of the Island should authorize the appointment of delegates to act in conjunction with those from the other Provinces in arranging a plant of co-operation prior to the meeting of the Imperial Parliament, the delegated from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick are hereby pledged to support the policy of providing such an amount as may be necessary for the purchase of the proprietary rights, but not to exceed eight hundred thousand dollars. ($800,000).”

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